1001 Arabian Nights - Volume 1 by Sir Richard Francis Burton (Translator)

By Sir Richard Francis Burton (Translator)

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His head was as a dome, his hands like pitchforks, his legs long as masts and his mouth big as a cave; his teeth were like large stones, his nostrils ewers, his eyes two lamps and his look was fierce and lowering. Now when the Fisherman saw the Ifrit his side muscles quivered, his teeth chattered, his spittle dried up and he became blind about what to do. "[FN#66] Quoth the Fisherman, "O Marid,[FN#67] diddest thou say, Sulayman the Apostle of Allah; and Sulayman is dead some thou sand and eight hundred years ago,[FN#68] and we are now in the last days of the world!

Then the Divan broke up, and King Shahryar entered his palace. When it was the Third Night, And the King had had his will of the Wazir's daughter, Dunyazad, her sister, said to her, "Finish for us that tale of thine;" and she replied, "With joy and goodly gree! It hath reached me, O auspicious King, that when the third old man told a tale to the Jinni more wondrous than the two preceding, the Jinni marvelled with exceeding marvel, and, shaking with delight, cried, Lo! " Thereupon the merchant embraced the old men and thanked them, and these Shaykhs wished him joy on being saved and fared forth each one for his own city.

And recited this couplet: Come back and so will I! Keep faith and so will I! * But if ye fain forsake, I'll requite till quits we cry! And Shahrazad perceived the dawn of day and ceased saying her permitted say. " Then he sent for the Fisherman and commended him to bring four other fish like the first and to take with him three men as witnesses.

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